Cracow - capitol of polish medieval history

. A larger number of people can be taken away from him by coach and drive to the hotel. In contrast, individuals can use taxis or public transport. From various parts of the Polish cii=ty you can commute by train. These types of t

Dodane: 24-06-2016 13:39
Cracow - capitol of polish medieval history

Access to Krakow by train

Organizing tourist visits to Cracow is a relatively easy task logistically. Foreign tourists fly to the airplane and land on the international airport in Cracow. A larger number of people can be taken away from him by coach and drive to the hotel. In contrast, individuals can use taxis or public transport. From various parts of the Polish cii=ty you can commute by train. These types of trips are usually organized by a single tourists or families with children. In contrast, school trips, student or corporate commute to Cracow coach. The fact that the cracked, you can so easily get certainly more encouraged to visit this city.


Vistula - about the name

The name was first recorded by Pomponius Mela in a.d. 40 and by Pliny in a.d. 77 in his Natural History. Mela names the river Vistula (3.33), Pliny uses Vistla (4.81, 4.97, 4.100). The root of the name Vistula is Indo-European *u?eis- ?to ooze, flow slowly? (cf. Sanskrit ?????? / ave?an ?they flowed?, Old Norse veisa ?slime?) and is found in many European rivernames (e.g. Weser, Viesinta).2 The diminutive endings -ila, -ula, were used in many Indo-European languages, including Latin (see Ursula).

In writing about the Vistula River and its peoples, Ptolemy uses the Greek spelling Ouistoula. Other ancient sources spell it Istula. Ammianus Marcellinus refers to the Bisula (Book 22), note the lack the -t-. Jordanes (Getica 5 & 17) uses Viscla while the Anglo-Saxon poem Widsith refers to it as the Wistla.3 12th-century Polish chronicler Wincenty Kadłubek Latinised the rivername as Vandalus, a form presumably influenced by Lithuanian vandu? ?water?, while Jan Długosz in his Annales seu cronicae incliti regni Poloniae called the Vistula ?white waters? (Alba aqua), perhaps referring to the White Little Vistula (Biała Wisełka): ?a nationibus orientalibus Polonis vicinis, ob aquae candorem Alba aqua ... nominatur.?

Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vistula


Some facts about Cracow

Kraków (Polish pronunciation: ?krakuf About this sound listen (help?info)), also Cracow or Krakow (US English /?kr??ka?/, UK English /?kr?ka?/),23 is the second largest and one of the oldest cities in Poland. Situated on the Vistula River (Polish: Wisła) in the Lesser Poland region, the city dates back to the 7th century.4 Kraków has traditionally been one of the leading centres of Polish academic, cultural, and artistic life and is one of Poland's most important economic hubs. It was the capital of the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland from 1038 to 1569; the Polish?Lithuanian Commonwealth from 1569 to 1596;5 the Free City of Kraków from 1815 to 1846; the Grand Duchy of Cracow from 1846 to 1918; and Kraków Voivodeship from the 14th century to 1998. It has been the capital of Lesser Poland Voivodeship since 1999.


Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krak%C3%B3w